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Staying up for climate change

Published On: Mar 18 2014 08:02:24 PM CDT
Neil Heinen photo

So it’s come to this in the United States Congress; all night talk-athons. A group of 26 Democrats have taken to commandeering the floor of the Senate at 6:30 p.m. on a given day and speaking non-stop until 9 a.m. the next day to draw attention to the urgency of addressing global climate change.

Yes, it feels like a stunt, or worse, given the image of an outgrown adult pajama party in suits instead of pajamas. But the unfortunate truth is more traditional methods of getting past the ideological stubbornness of lawmakers courting the political benefits of denying climate change -- even at the expense of national security -- simply haven’t work. And those national security experts, an overwhelming majority of scientists and others, are telling us we don’t have time to fool around anymore.

Something has to be done to expose the potential damage posed by climate change deniers. If that requires a gimmick like all night talk-athons on the floor of the Senate, so be it.

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