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Sunshine Week 2013 - More Light, Less Heat

Published On: Mar 11 2013 11:04:28 AM CDT
Neil Heinen photo

 

 

SUNSHINE WEEK 2013 – MORE LIGHT, LESS HEAT

03/10/13

Today marks the beginning of Sunshine Week 2013, the annual observance of the importance of a transparent government and citizens having access to meetings and records from that government. Openness is simply key to a representative democracy and history is replete with examples of democracy functioning at its best when citizens are fully informed and involved.

Yet the need for Sunshine Week never seems to end. Just a couple of weeks ago some United States Supreme Court Justices, in oral arguments, questioned if access to public information is a fundamental right. And here in Wisconsin, on both state and local municipal records, elected officials continually seek to skirt open records and meets laws, or change those laws to make them less restrictive.


Freedom of information is vital to democracy and to a media that helps make democracy work. We ask you support in keeping the sun of open government shining.

 

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