Madison
44° F
Overcast
Overcast
Advertisement

One-sport kids risk more injuries, weight gain

Published On: Dec 24 2013 02:09:54 AM CST   Updated On: Aug 28 2013 03:15:01 PM CDT
Children sports, football

ActionPics/iStock

COLUMBUS, Ohio – As millions of children prepare to return to school and to their favorite sports, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center suggest parents encourage youngsters to consider more than one activity to avoid injuries and, surprisingly, unwanted weight gain.

While many kids choose to play only one sport in hopes of gaining an edge on the competition and improving their chances of future success, Tim Hewett, director of research at Ohio State University Sports Medicine, said that strategy comes with the risk of negative long-term effects.

“You could call it the Tiger Woods syndrome,” Hewett said. “Young athletes feel like they have to play a single sport and they have to play it year round.”

After following more than 500 athletes for more than a decade, Hewett and his Ohio State team found that single-sport athletes had a 50 percent higher risk of knee injury. He said part of the problem is repetition -- doing the same motions year after year can wear out bones and joints.

In addition, if a one-sport athlete did suffer a knee injury, they were also more likely to struggle with weight gain, often for years. In the case of young girls who play one sport and injure a knee, the study (funded by the National Institutes of Health and published in the British Journal of Medicine in May) found that their risk of long-term obesity increases 33 percent.

“Even when we follow them over multiple years, they tend to retain the weight gain,” Hewett said.

He recommends playing more than one sport to help build core strength and balance several muscle groups. This prevents the same muscles from being used consistently more than others.

“A diversity of activity is going to promote balance within your neuromuscular system,” Hewett said. “You’re going to be able to be proficient and excel at multiple tasks.”

Source: http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/Pages/index.aspx

Advertisement
  • PHOTOS: 27 tons of documents destroyed during BBB Shredfest 2016

    The free BBB Shredfest event Saturday offered anyone with documents containing personal information to shred up to three bags. Destroying documents is one way to protect one's identity and thwart fraudsters.

    More than 1,600 cars stopped by two Madison locations from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday, and 27 tons of documents were shredded, a Better Business Bureau representative said. The sites were at SVA Certified Public Accountants, 1221 John Q Hammons Dr. and Warner Park, 2930 N. Sherman Ave.

  • Elise Romas

    PHOTOS: Thousands take part in 34th annual CrazyLegs 2016

    The 34th annual CrazyLegs Classic 8K Run and 2-mile Walk Saturday raised money for UW Athletics. As of Friday night, 13,000 people had signed up to participate, and organizers expected more to register Saturday morning before the race begins in waves at 11 a.m.

    WINNERS: Pat Jenkins, 24, of Cambridge, is the top finisher in the men's category. UW law student Jessa Hackman, 24, of Madison, is the top female finisher.

Advertisement