Madison
69° F
Partly Cloudy
Partly Cloudy
Advertisement

Mary Jane Martin

Published On: Nov 23 2013 03:12:47 PM CST
Obits_Icon

MADISON -- Mary Jane Martin, age 91, of Madison, passed away on Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. She was born on July 7, 1922, in Madison, the daughter of William and Margaret Straub. She married Gene Martin on Oct. 6, 1942, in Newport, R.I.

Mary Jane is survived by her children, Maureen (James) Martin, Peggy (Robert) Rakow, Michael (Leslie) Martin, Mary (Aaron) Turner, Teresa (Keith) Bulgrin, and Patrick Martin; grandchildren, Michael, Meredith, Shawn, Shannon, Patrick, Brian, Michelle, Amy, Sara, Kathleen, and Alexandra; great-grandchildren, Melanie, Marnie, Madeleine, Mackenzie, Merette, Jordan, Ian, Jazzmyn, Miles, Nina, Isabella, Aurora, and Carter; and sister, Betty (Earl) Richter. She was preceded in death by her husband, Gene.

Private family services were held. Memorials may be made to Mary Jane’s favorite charity, St. Joseph’s Indian School, P.O. Box 325, Chamberlain, S.D. 57326

Advertisement
  • Bill-Cosby-pre-trial-hearing

    Matt Rourke-Pool/Getty Images

    Cosby sex scandal timeline

    A Pennsylvania judge ruled Tuesday, May 24, there is enough evidence, for Bill Cosby to go to trial for a 2004 case. Cosby goes to trial for felony indecent assault charges and faces up to 10 years in prison. Check out a timeline of rape and other sexual misconduct accusations made against the comedian.

  • Edward Nero1

    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    Officers charged in Freddie Gray case

    Baltimore Police Officer Edward Nero was found not guilty of all charges Monday, May 23, in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, Judge Barry Williams ruled after a bench trial. Nero is one of six officers tried in connection in the case and the second to be tried. Here is a closer look at the cases of six officers charged in Gray's death.

  • PHOTOS: Birds, birds, birds!

    Birdwatchers spotted a variety of the feathered critters on a hike in Lake Mills Saturday morning. Ed Hahn, education co-chair for the Wisconsin Society for Ornithology said some were common backyard birds and others were rare sights.

Advertisement