44° F

Woman killed during storms in NE Wisconsin

Published On: Dec 24 2013 02:55:37 AM CST   Updated On: Aug 22 2013 05:35:21 PM CDT


Severe storms packing winds estimated at 90 to 100 mph damaged residential property, downed power lines and toppled trees, including one which fatally injured a motorist in Menominee County.

Emergency management officials say a woman was killed in Keshena Wednesday night when a tree fell on her vehicle.

Authorities say about a dozen homes in the Bonduel area of Shawano County sustained damage. A lightning strike caused a fire at a nursing home forcing the evacuation of approximately 13 residents. They were taken to a sister facility.

The National Weather Service says most of the damage in Shawano County was caused by straight-line winds.

More than 20,000 utility customers lost power in the storms. By Thursday, crews had restored service to all but about 1,000 customers.

  • World Series Game 1 Progressive Field wide shot

    Jason Miller/Getty Images

    2016 World Series: Cubs even things up

    The 2016 World Series started Oct. 25, at Progressive Field in Cleveland, with the National League champion Chicago Cubs and the American League champion Cleveland Indians.

  • PHOTOS: Vilas Zoo announces new holiday lights exhibit

    The Henry Vilas Zoo will light up nights this holiday season with its new Zoo Lights event. The Zoo Lights exhibit will offer zoo-goers a stroll down Candy Cane Lane with festive lights and sounds. Zoo organizers announced the Zoo Light exhibit Wednesday and said thousands of lights will transform the zoo into a winter wonderland Nov. 25-Jan. 1.

    Admission is $7 and Zoo Lights will run Thursdays through Sundays beginning at 5:30 p.m.

  • Takata air bag recall by the numbers - blurb

    Joe Raedle/Getty Images

    Takata air bag recall by the numbers

    Millions of cars have been recalled due to defective Takata air bags across the world. One in every 10 cars in the U.S. is affected by the recall, Automotive News reports. The publication is calling this the "recall of the century," as up to 90 million more recalls are possible.