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Teacher shows 'Saw' movie to sixth-graders

Published On: Jun 12 2013 10:45:42 AM CDT
Updated On: Jun 13 2013 05:41:46 AM CDT
Jigsaw from the movie Saw

Lions Gate Films Home Entertainment

A teacher was suspended after showing a screening of the R-rated horror film "Saw" to his class of sixth graders.

The students at a middle school in Colombes, France were surprised at watching what was, for many, their first horror film in class, according to Europe 1. "This will be your first horror film," Jean-Baptiste Clément allegedly told the class before showing the 2004 film, which is a violent and graphic story about free will.

An investigation is underway to determine whether more serious punishment is merited, but for now Clément's suspension only lasted one day.

"Saw" was originally classified as NC-17 but was re-edited to achieve an R rating. According to the Motion Picture Association of America, it earned its rating thanks to "grisly violence and language."

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