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Raw milk debate goes to State Capitol

Published On: Sep 11 2013 06:59:49 PM CDT

MADISON, Wis. -

The fight over raw milk has gone from the farm to the Capitol as lawmakers heard testimony on a new bill that would legalize the sale of unpasteurized milk.

The State Senate’s Rural Issues Committee heard testimony over a bill to loosen raw milk restrictions Wednesday afternoon.

Seventeen groups, including dairy farmers and doctors, are among those against the bill. They say raw milk is harmful to consumers and to dairy businesses.

“Whether it be the cheese makers or whether it be the medical association, we did not see the need to compromise because to us, the product is unsafe,” said Sean Pfaff, spokesman for the Wisconsin Safe Milk Coalition.

Supporters say raw milk is healthier and regulating it takes away their right to choose food.

“First of all, I maintain raw milk is safe. I don’t think anything bad is going to happen, although sometimes bad things do happen with food,” said Sen. Glenn Grotham, R-West Bend.

Lawmakers won’t be voting on the bill Wednesday night but if the bill passes the committee, it will go to the Senate floor.

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