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New energy, optimism in schools

Published On: Sep 24 2013 09:06:22 AM CDT   Updated On: Oct 01 2013 12:00:00 PM CDT
Jennifer Cheatham

MMSD Superintendent Jennifer Cheatham

As we continue our updates on our editorial agenda for the year we have to admit this issue looks quite different from when we first put in on the agenda in January.

Our major concern then was a lack of common goals for our public schools with various groups doing their own good work to help close the achievement gap but without a shared vision for how to do it. If nothing else new, Superintendent Jen Cheatham has convinced all of us to work with her on her plan and give it a chance to be successful.

So far, so good.

There is indeed a new sense of collaboration and with it new energy and optimism. And what we find most encouraging is all stakeholders are at the table in an atmosphere of honest dialogue and mutual respect.

Budgets, labor issues, school report cards and more are all being considered with a notable lack of drama and deference to helping kids learn and teachers teach.

The longer that goes on the better this agenda item looks.

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