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Officer charged with hit-and-run, OWI

Published On: Jul 24 2013 11:03:20 AM CDT   Updated On: Jul 24 2013 11:04:27 AM CDT
police generic light bars file photo


A Wisconsin Dells police sergeant was cited on suspicion of driving intoxicated and hitting a parked car last week.

Wisconsin Dells Police Chief Jody Ward said in a statement Wednesday that officers responded to a report of a hit-and-run accident at Zeus's Village on Highway A on July 17 at about 4 a.m.

Police said Brent Brown, 32, of Wisconsin Dells, was suspected of hitting an unattended vehicle and leaving, first-offense operating while intoxicated and lane deviation.

Ward said Brown, who is a sergeant with the Dells police department, was off duty when the alleged accident occurred. The investigation was turned over to the State Patrol, the chief said.

Brown is suspended with pay, Ward said in the statement on Wednesday.

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