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New mini ambulance makes off-road, event rescues faster

Published On: Jul 03 2013 10:06:32 PM CDT   Updated On: Jul 04 2013 09:37:06 AM CDT

ASAP Medstat

MADISON, Wis. -

Officials are keeping people safe with a new mini ambulance that can get to emergencies off-road and at large events faster than a normal ambulance.

The machine is smaller than a normal ambulance and is built on an ATV frame specifically for on- and off-road events, like Rhythm and Booms, and for emergency incidents.

Called the ASAP Medstat, it is the first of its kind in Wisconsin.

The enclosure fits a full-size cot, and can accommodate 1,500 pounds of equipment and two paramedics just like a normal ambulance.

There’s also air-conditioning and heat, so paramedics are prepared for Wisconsin’s seasons.

The difference between the mini ambulance and a normal ambulance is its all-terrain capabilities means it won’t get stuck and it’s easier to navigate.

“We have had incidents where we have been off road and in those cases it’s a matter of trying to do your best to get the patient out to a point where the road ambulance is there to meet them,” said Richard Kinkade, Madison Fire Department division chief.

The mini ambulance doesn’t take patients to the hospital because it only goes up to 40 mph. Instead, it meets up with a road ambulance that will take over and drive the patient from there.

The mini ambulance costs about $52,000, but the fire department bought it with money the city gets from the federal government meant to increase EMS capabilities that was implemented after 9/11.

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