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Man loses license for driving too slowly

Published On: Aug 21 2013 10:49:59 AM CDT
Updated On: Aug 21 2013 09:25:42 AM CDT
green hybrid car driving down road

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In January 2014, authorities say a New Mexico woman called in a fake report of a gunman near a convenience store to help a friend avoid a traffic ticket over a taillight.

A Minnesota man recently lost his license because he refused to drive faster.

59year-old Gary Constans of Lester Prairie, Minn. was warned by authorities nine separate times to drive faster on two-lane highways, but failed to comply.

This week, the Minnesota Court of Appeals upheld a decision to revoke Constans' license, reported the Pioneer Press.

Law enforcement officers told Constans repeatedly that his driving creates dangerous driving conditions for everyone on rural, two-lane roads.

Constans told the Pioneer Press he tries to drive no faster than 48 miles per hour even on rural highways because going slow helps him save on gas and avoid hitting "critters."

The retired Postal Service worker said the court's decision is "totally communism. There's no freedom anymore."

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