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Hungry squirrel eats family's SUV

Published On: Jul 12 2013 09:58:47 AM CDT   Updated On: Jul 12 2013 10:11:14 AM CDT
Squirrel eats through car

A South Florida family discovered that the damage done to their SUV was not caused by vandals, but instead by a menacing squirrel.

Nora Ziegler was living in fear that she and her family were being targeted by vandals, but then discovered the true culprit, reports WPTV.

Ziegler first noticed a 6-inch hole that looked cut out above her wheel well and called deputies.

"They asked me if I had any enemies, I said no," said Ziegler.

Then she found another hole, slightly larger and above the rear left wheel. Again, she called the police, but they didn't provide any answers.

Finally, Ziegler was outside one evening and happened to see that it was actually a squirrel causing the damage to her SUV. She quickly grabbed her smartphone and started shooting video of the squirrel in the act of chewing through the side of her vehicle. Ziegler is grateful that the mystery has been solved.

The Zieglers have taken to calling the squirrel "Munchy."


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