Madison
78° F
Mostly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Advertisement

Hockey fans sue arena over beer prices

Published On: Mar 13 2014 11:29:29 AM CDT   Updated On: Mar 13 2014 06:02:27 AM CDT
hockey sticks

Angry hockey fans are suing their local arena after they allege they were tricked into buying "large" beers, not realizing they are actually the exact same size as "small" beers.

The lawsuit claims CenturyLink Arena, home of the Idaho Steelheads hockey team, charged customers $3 more for a taller, more narrow cup advertised as a "large" that actually holds the same amount of beer as the shorter, wider cup described as a "small."

The four fans who filed the suit and are seeking $10,000 in damages.

One of the fans claims to have attended at least 30 events over the past three years at the arena and that he purchased beer each time. The other plaintiffs say they have attended events on and off for five years, buying at least one $7 beer each time.

The lawsuit came just two days after another hockey fan posted a video on YouTube which showed her and her boyfriend each pouring large beers into small cups and small beers into large cups to show they are the same size.

Given the popularity of that video, CenturyLink announced that the company would purchase new cups for the large beers that would hold 24 ounces instead of the previous 20 ounces for a bigger difference in size.

Advertisement
  • PHOTOS: K-9 teams from across Wis. train on UW campus

    MADISON, Wis. -- University of Wisconsin-Madison police hosted a statewide explosives training day for K-9 teams Thursday on campus.

    UWPD spokesman Marc Lovicott said Thursday's training involved multiple scenarios including large load explosive detection, dark room scenarios, plus more typical game-day situations that officers and their K-9 partner routinely encounter such as distractions, loud noises and an encounter with Bucky Badger.

  • Dwayne Johnson, San Andreas premiere

    Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

    World's highest paid actors

    Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson tops Forbes' newly released highest paid actors list, but what other Hollywood leading men made the list?

  • Oxycontin pills

    Darren McCollester/Getty Images

    What to know about prescription painkillers

    The Center for Disease Control says nearly 2 million Americans either abused or became dependent on prescription opioid drugs in 2014. More than 14,000 people died from overdoses of the drugs, according to the CDC, and opioid drugs are still frequently prescribed to treat everything from cancer and post-surgical pain, to bone fractures and headaches, according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse. Here are questions for you -- and your doctor -- before starting an opioid prescription:

Advertisement