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Fourth graders shave heads for friend

Published On: Jun 13 2013 02:07:50 PM CDT
Bald man

michellegibson/iStock

A boy fighting for his life recently discovered the power of friendship.
Travis Selinka was diagnosed with a brain tumor and had radiation therapy, causing him to lose all his hair.
After the seven weeks of radiation therapy, the bald 10-year-old was embarrassed to return to school.
"He was a little nervous about coming back only because he didn't have hair," Travis' mother Lynne Selinka said. "He was afraid what the kids would think."
His friends at El Camino Creek Elementary School were quick to pick up on Selinka's feelings. Fifteen of them went to the barber shop and shaved their heads.
"Without me even knowing it, one of the boys got together with his mother and they planned a whole thing at this barbershop," fourth grader teacher Karin Roberts said. "Since they did it, Travis hasn't worn his hat. They all just are beautiful amazing people."
"It was overwhelming and every time I think about it, it brings tears to my eyes….every one of them shaved their head for Travis," said his mother.
"I want to thank them all very much for doing that. It has made it a lot easier for me," Selinka said.

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