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Former Alaska state worker charged with workers' comp fraud

Published On: May 21 2013 07:44:58 PM CDT

A former Alaska state employee and his supposed masseuse are accused of worker's compensation fraud.

Scott A. Groom and Laurayne K. Fischer are charged with 93 counts including perjury, theft and falsification of business records.

The Anchorage Daily News says the two are currently living in Wisconsin.

According to prosecutors, Groom and Fischer defrauded the State of Alaska out of more than $20,000 of worker's comp benefits.

Prosecutors say Groom was an operator at a state Department of Transportation weigh station when he was injured on the job in 1999. Years later, Groom settled a worker's compensation claim with the state for $201,500.

Prosecutors say Groom never got massage treatment from Fischer as claimed and that the two submitted fraudulent workers' compensation reimbursement and later lied about it.

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