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Family shuns all post-1986 technology

Published On: Sep 11 2013 10:22:52 AM CDT   Updated On: Sep 12 2013 09:58:31 AM CDT
Family lives like 1986

Screengrab

Blair McMillan and his family in Canada are living like it's 1986 -- really.

While most people couldn't imagine a day without their smartphone or the Internet, the McMillan family has decided to go a year without any post-1986 technology as a social experiment, the Toronto Sun reported.

It started last year, when McMillan noticed his 5-year-old son preferred to stay indoors and play video games on in iPad rather than go outside and play.

He decided to take things back to 1986 -- the year he and his wife were born -- in hopes of teaching their kids there's more to life than the Wii.

Since April, the McMillans have had no Internet. They watch what TV channels they go get on an old 1980s TV set encased in a wooden cabinet and listen to music on cassettes.

They have thrown out their cellphones, mail real letters instead of sending emails and use film-based cameras to capture their memories.

"I've been touching a lot of people's lives just through the people that I've met, when people see me and the way I look," McMillan told the Guelph Mercury. "They will stop to take pictures of me, and then I can talk to them. They think what we're doing is really cool."

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