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Door County homicide trial ends in hung jury

Published On: Jun 22 2013 05:59:23 PM CDT   Updated On: Jun 22 2013 05:59:43 PM CDT
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The trial of an Illinois man accused of killing his friend and her unborn baby at a resort in Wisconsin's Door County has ended in a hung jury.

Brian Cooper faced two counts of first-degree intentional homicide in the strangulation deaths of 21-year-old Alisha Bromfield and her fetus last August. Cooper and Bromfield were from Plainfield, Ill.

Judge Todd Ehlers declared the mistrial Saturday after jurors failed to reach a unanimous verdict.

District Attorney Ray Pelrine said Cooper will be retried on both charges. A date has not been set.

The prosecutor said notes passed to the court show the vast majority of jurors were ready to convict Cooper on all counts, but one juror completely withdrew from the deliberations. He says Bromfield's family is stunned and disappointed.

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