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Caffeinated toothbrush in the works

Published On: May 17 2013 09:29:58 AM CDT   Updated On: May 17 2013 10:23:20 AM CDT
Toothbrush with toothpaste

Forget coffee. Caffeine addicts may soon be able to get their fix when they brush their teeth in the morning.

Colgate-Palmolive has applied for a patent to develop a toothbrush with a patch that would release the chemical into the mouth during use, the Daily Mail reported.

According to the patent application, the toothbrush could also be packed with flavoring like berry or lemon or even herbal remedies like lavender or chamomile.

The patch would fit on the head of the toothbrush and would last three months, according to the Daily Mail.

One unusual flavor prospect? Hot chili peppers.

"As one example, a chemical known as capsaicin, found naturally in chile (sic) peppers, can be used to provide a tingle, a hot or warm massage, or a heating or warm, soothing sensation to a user," the patent reads. "Capsaicin is also known to provide pain relief and numbing sensations when topically applied."


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