Madison
76° F
Mostly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Advertisement

Businesses burned by freezing cold winter

Published On: Feb 03 2014 06:36:03 AM CST   Updated On: Feb 03 2014 07:05:09 AM CST
MIDDLETON, Wis. -

For video of this story, visit http://video.channel3000.com or the video section of our app

James “Moose” Werner has seen some bad winters in his more than 30 years running Club Tavern, but he can’t remember one that froze out business like this one.

“This winter sucks. Its the easiest way to put it,” Werner said.

Werner said fewer customers are walking through his doors. He said some of that is due to the economy, but the frigid temperatures certainly haven’t helped.

“Wisconsin people tend to be hearty and tend to come out,” Werner said, “but when you don't have money and you're worried about paying the MGE bill, you stay in.”

Werner said he’s 10% behind what he usually earns in winter, and he knows other businesses feeling the same pressure.  He said customers should make an extra effort to spend at family-owned stores and restaurants.

“Just when you get a chance, throw on some extra clothes and come out and help,” Werner said.

Advertisement
  • PHOTOS: K-9 teams from across Wis. train on UW campus

    MADISON, Wis. -- University of Wisconsin-Madison police hosted a statewide explosives training day for K-9 teams Thursday on campus.

    UWPD spokesman Marc Lovicott said Thursday's training involved multiple scenarios including large load explosive detection, dark room scenarios, plus more typical game-day situations that officers and their K-9 partner routinely encounter such as distractions, loud noises and an encounter with Bucky Badger.

  • Dwayne Johnson, San Andreas premiere

    Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

    World's highest paid actors

    Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson tops Forbes' newly released highest paid actors list, but what other Hollywood leading men made the list?

  • Oxycontin pills

    Darren McCollester/Getty Images

    What to know about prescription painkillers

    The Center for Disease Control says nearly 2 million Americans either abused or became dependent on prescription opioid drugs in 2014. More than 14,000 people died from overdoses of the drugs, according to the CDC, and opioid drugs are still frequently prescribed to treat everything from cancer and post-surgical pain, to bone fractures and headaches, according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse. Here are questions for you -- and your doctor -- before starting an opioid prescription:

Advertisement