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AG hopeful cited in alcohol crash

Published On: Jan 09 2014 04:37:18 PM CST

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Ismael Ozanne, Dane County District Attorney

MADISON, Wis. -

Wisconsin attorney general hopeful Ismael Ozanne's campaign says he was ticketed in an alcohol-related crash in 1986.

The revelation comes one day after Republican Brad Schimel's campaign acknowledged a drunken-driving ticket in 1990. The Ozanne campaign disclosed his ticket in response to inquiries by The Associated Press to other candidates in the race.

A campaign statement Thursday said Ozanne, a Democrat, crashed his car in Madison and was ticketed after a Breathalyzer test showed his blood alcohol level at 0.04 percent. That was under Wisconsin's 0.10 percent limit to drive at the time and he wasn't cited for drunken driving.

However, Wisconsin's "Not a Drop" law prohibits drivers under the legal drinking age from having any alcohol in their bodies. Ozanne was 16 then and was cited under that law.

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