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Zoo chimpanzee dies following examination

Published On: Mar 11 2013 02:35:36 PM CDT   Updated On: Mar 07 2013 08:26:04 AM CST

Casey

MADISON, Wis -

A chimpanzee from the Henry Vilas Zoo in Madison died following a physical examination, according to zoo officials.

Casey was a 31-year-old male chimp who was being examined as part of a preventative medicine program. He died during the anesthetic recovery process, according to zoo officials.

“Casey was a well-loved animal and a favorite of many at our zoo. He will be dearly missed by zoo staff and the community,” said Ronda Schwetz, zoo director.

The tests conducted on Casey included blood collection to evaluate liver, kidney, and other organ function, and to test for diabetes and other metabolic diseases. Cardiac ultrasound and X-rays were taken to assess heart health. The examination was done in partnership with the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine.

Testing will be conducted to determine the cause of Casey's death.

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