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Lawyer: 14-year-old won't seek juvenile court trial in slaying

Published On: Jan 23 2013 02:57:28 PM CST

A Sheboygan teenager charged in his great-grandmother's killing will no longer seek to have his case tried in juvenile court.

Defense attorney George Limbeck had earlier filed a motion to have the 14-year-old boy's case moved to juvenile court. But Limbeck said Wednesday the boy will no longer contest his case remaining in adult court.

Limbeck declined to comment to The Sheboygan Press on the decision.

The boy and a 14-year-old friend are accused of bludgeoning 78-year-old Barbara Olson to death at her Sheboygan Falls home on Sept. 17. The boys are accused of ransacking Olson's house and stealing money to buy marijuana and pizza. Both boys were 13 at the time.

Attorneys for the other boy also have filed a motion to move his case to juvenile court.

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