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John Shabaz, senior federal judge, dies at 81

Published On: Sep 02 2012 12:42:03 AM CDT   Updated On: Sep 02 2012 11:17:59 AM CDT
Judge, Court Generic

John Shabaz, a senior federal judge in Wisconsin's western district, has died. He was 81.

Shabaz's wife, Patty, told The Associated Press her husband died Friday after an illness.

The Wisconsin State Journal reported Shabaz was known as a demanding, dedicated and fast-paced judge. He was appointed to the federal bench in 1981.

From 1964 until 1981, he was a Republican state representative and had a reputation as a fiery debater. He served as minority leader from 1973 to 1979.

Gov. Scott Walker said Shabaz was a dedicated public servant who will be missed.

He is survived by his wife and four children.

Visitation is at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Eastside Evangelical Lutheran Church in Madison, with funeral services at 4 p.m.

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