44° F

Horicon bank robbery ends in high-speed chase

Published On: Jan 18 2013 04:40:22 PM CST   Updated On: Jan 18 2013 04:40:28 PM CST

A Horicon bank robbery ended in a high-speed chase and a rollover crash Friday.

According to a Horicon Police Department statement, a man entered a U.S. Bank branch and presented a note to a clerk that said he had a gun, and if the teller gave him money he would not hurt anyone.

After a witness gave police a detailed description of the man’s vehicle, police shared the information with surrounding agencies.

Beaver Dam police located the vehicle and tried to stop it, according to the statement. Police pursued the vehicle in a chase that reached 110 mph before the vehicle lost control and crashed on Highway 151.

The suspect was taken to Beaver Dam Community Hospital and treated for non-life-threatening injuries, the statement said. Police believe he acted alone in the bank robbery.

  • World Series Game 1 Progressive Field wide shot

    Jason Miller/Getty Images

    2016 World Series: Cubs even things up

    The 2016 World Series started Oct. 25, at Progressive Field in Cleveland, with the National League champion Chicago Cubs and the American League champion Cleveland Indians.

  • PHOTOS: Vilas Zoo announces new holiday lights exhibit

    The Henry Vilas Zoo will light up nights this holiday season with its new Zoo Lights event. The Zoo Lights exhibit will offer zoo-goers a stroll down Candy Cane Lane with festive lights and sounds. Zoo organizers announced the Zoo Light exhibit Wednesday and said thousands of lights will transform the zoo into a winter wonderland Nov. 25-Jan. 1.

    Admission is $7 and Zoo Lights will run Thursdays through Sundays beginning at 5:30 p.m.

  • Takata air bag recall by the numbers - blurb

    Joe Raedle/Getty Images

    Takata air bag recall by the numbers

    Millions of cars have been recalled due to defective Takata air bags across the world. One in every 10 cars in the U.S. is affected by the recall, Automotive News reports. The publication is calling this the "recall of the century," as up to 90 million more recalls are possible.