Madison
76° F
Mostly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Advertisement

Clear Channel replaces local morning radio show

Published On: Feb 25 2013 10:26:58 PM CST   Updated On: Feb 25 2013 10:27:49 PM CST
MADISON, Wis. -

A local radio show team will no longer be broadcasting during the morning commute.

Clear Channel Media is expanding its use of national syndicated morning programs.

Tracy Dixon and Mike Heller of 96.3 Star Country (WMAD FM) are being replaced by a national radio show called The Bobby Bones Show.

Barry Orton, a telecommunications professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said the changes are part of a bigger trend.

"The shame of it is that you don't get local flavor, and that's one thing that radio has been great for over the many, many years. And now it's the same as listening to satellite radio, or listening over the computer. You can get the same thing no matter where you were," Orton said.

Clear Channel Media released a statement about the changes, saying: "Fans of our current morning show, Tracy (Dixon) & Mike (Heller) can follow her to her new afternoon drive slot (3 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays). Mike Heller will now focus all his efforts on his afternoon sports talk show which airs on The BIG 1070 (WTSO AM) in Madison and is simulcast in Milwaukee on The BIG 920 (WOKY AM)."

Advertisement
  • PHOTOS: K-9 teams from across Wis. train on UW campus

    MADISON, Wis. -- University of Wisconsin-Madison police hosted a statewide explosives training day for K-9 teams Thursday on campus.

    UWPD spokesman Marc Lovicott said Thursday's training involved multiple scenarios including large load explosive detection, dark room scenarios, plus more typical game-day situations that officers and their K-9 partner routinely encounter such as distractions, loud noises and an encounter with Bucky Badger.

  • Dwayne Johnson, San Andreas premiere

    Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

    World's highest paid actors

    Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson tops Forbes' newly released highest paid actors list, but what other Hollywood leading men made the list?

  • Oxycontin pills

    Darren McCollester/Getty Images

    What to know about prescription painkillers

    The Center for Disease Control says nearly 2 million Americans either abused or became dependent on prescription opioid drugs in 2014. More than 14,000 people died from overdoses of the drugs, according to the CDC, and opioid drugs are still frequently prescribed to treat everything from cancer and post-surgical pain, to bone fractures and headaches, according to the National Institute of Drug Abuse. Here are questions for you -- and your doctor -- before starting an opioid prescription:

Advertisement