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Cell phones, TVs, Wi-Fi banned in small town

Published On: Apr 18 2013 04:26:15 AM CDT   Updated On: Apr 18 2013 09:19:36 AM CDT
Cellphone or mobile phone pile


Some people claim that wireless technology makes them sick. Literally.
So-called "Wi-Fi refugees" suffering from the controversial disorder electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) have moved to Green Bank, West Virginia, where cell phone and Wi-Fi signals are banned, reports Yahoo! Health. The reason for the silence in the small town with less than 150 residents is that Green Bank is located in the US National Radio Quiet Zone. This zone is a 13,000-square mile area where radio and TV broadcasts, Wi-Fi networks, and signals from cell phones, Bluetooth and other high-tech electronic devices—are outlawed, to prevent transmissions from interfering with a local radio telescope and a nearby military radio installation.

Green Bank is now home to EHS suffers as well as those who simply want to live without wireless technology.

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