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Burglar forgets ski mask, uses bucket to hide identity

Published On: Jan 30 2013 03:18:20 PM CST   Updated On: Jan 20 2013 09:43:19 AM CST
Bucket head

A burglar who realized he had forgotten a disguise decided to use a bucket to conceal his identity.

Richard Boudreaux, 23, allegedly burglarized several businesses in his hometown of Slidell, Louisiana, including a seasfood restaurant where he use to work, according to But the amateur criminal apparently forgot his ski mask at home, so he improvised by wearing a bucket over his head to hide his face from the restaurant's security cameras.

Unfortunately for Boudreaux, his face was caught by security cameras anyway and he was arrested at his home a short time after the burglary. He has been charged with two counts of burglary, as well as possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia, which were found in his home at the time of his arrest, reports the Times-Picayune.

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