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Black bear returns to stir up neighborhood

Published On: Apr 05 2013 07:25:28 AM CDT   Updated On: Apr 05 2013 03:13:41 PM CDT

A black bear has awakened from hibernation and returned to an Eau Claire neighborhood where it's frightening residents, going through garbage cans and breaking bird feeders.

Neighbors want the bear removed. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources said it's just part of spring -- give the bear two weeks and it will be gone.

Lowayne Rust told WEAU-TV the bear has been roaming the neighborhood every year for about three years after hibernating in a nearby culvert under Interstate 94. While Rust worries about the safety of his dog, other neighbors worry about their young children.

The DNR's Ed Cullhane said bears typically aren't removed unless they are a danger or don't move on to more natural habitat within several weeks. The DNR suggests removing food sources, such as bird feeders.

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