Madison
79° F
Mostly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Advertisement

Big Wis. energy users get breaks on rate increases

Published On: Jan 13 2013 03:43:26 PM CST
MILWAUKEE -

Big energy users in Wisconsin are getting breaks on rate increases at the expense of other businesses and homeowners.

Regulators worked to limit utility rate increases for big factories and other large energy users this year, and that means higher power prices for others.

Public Service Commission chairman Phil Montgomery told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel the move is by design and is meant to foster Gov. Scott Walker's job-creation goals.

In rate cases finalized last month involving utilities in Milwaukee, Madison and Eau Claire, large manufacturers received smaller increases than homeowners and other businesses.

Commissioner Eric Callisto, who chaired the commission under Democratic Gov. Jim Doyle, broke from the Republicans on the commission in objecting to the breaks for large manufacturers because they pushed rates higher for other businesses.

Advertisement
  • Bill-Cosby-pre-trial-hearing

    Matt Rourke-Pool/Getty Images

    Cosby sex scandal timeline

    A Pennsylvania judge ruled Tuesday, May 24, there is enough evidence, for Bill Cosby to go to trial for a 2004 case. Cosby goes to trial for felony indecent assault charges and faces up to 10 years in prison. Check out a timeline of rape and other sexual misconduct accusations made against the comedian.

  • Edward Nero1

    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

    Officers charged in Freddie Gray case

    Baltimore Police Officer Edward Nero was found not guilty of all charges Monday, May 23, in connection with the death of Freddie Gray, Judge Barry Williams ruled after a bench trial. Nero is one of six officers tried in connection in the case and the second to be tried. Here is a closer look at the cases of six officers charged in Gray's death.

  • PHOTOS: Birds, birds, birds!

    Birdwatchers spotted a variety of the feathered critters on a hike in Lake Mills Saturday morning. Ed Hahn, education co-chair for the Wisconsin Society for Ornithology said some were common backyard birds and others were rare sights.

Advertisement