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Aussie injured in sex romp gets worker's comp

Published On: Dec 18 2012 10:03:48 AM CST   Updated On: Dec 19 2012 11:48:50 PM CST
Couple bed sex

iStock / Synergee

An Aussie woman injured while having sex in her hotel room during a business trip is eligible for worker's comp, a court has ruled.

The unidentified woman, in her late 30s, suffered nose and and mouth injuries when a light fixture fell on her face while "doing the deed" with a male friend in 2007, The Australian reported.

She claimed physical and psychological injuries, stating in court documents she later suffered depression and was unable to work for the government.

Her initial worker's comp claim was accepted, but then revoked by an administrative tribunal who ruled sex was "not an ordinary incident of an overnight stay" such as showering, sleeping and eating, The Associated Press reported.

Three appeals later, the Full Bench of the Federal Court ruled the injuries should be considered as being sustained during "the course of her employment."

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