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Memorial requests challenge police monument organizers

Published On: May 12 2013 01:51:16 PM CDT   Updated On: May 12 2013 02:29:17 PM CDT

DETROIT -

Tough decisions don't often confront the people responsible for organizing a national memorial for officers killed in the line of duty.

But recognizing fallen men and women in blue isn't always a black-and-white decision.

The cases of two inductees this year highlight challenges for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. It holds a vigil Monday for 321 officers added to the wall in Washington, D.C.

Detective Sgt. Caleb Embree Smith of Flint died by poisoning in 1921. Wauwatosa, Wis., Officer Jennifer Sebena was shot multiple times while working last Christmas Eve, and her husband is a suspect.

Smith's case remains unsolved. Sebena's was originally viewed as domestic violence. Both have been memorialized.

Officials said most applications have been approved during more than two decades.

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