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Blooming Grove apartments evacuated for high CO levels

Published On: Jun 25 2013 07:03:44 AM CDT   Updated On: Jun 27 2013 07:49:14 AM CDT


Fire crews were called to an apartment building after a routine check of the basement for flooding led to the discovery of high carbon monoxide levels.

The maintenance manager at the Holiday Apartments in Blooming Grove went down to the basement for a routine check of the sump pumps before going to bed.

That's when he smelled something and called MG & E right away.

The fire department came to look for a natural gas leak. But when they go there,  a carbon monoxide test came back extremely high in the basement and first floor.

That's when the maintenance manager evacuated the building.

"(There were) too many lives at stake," said Bryce Dale, Holiday Apartments maintenance manager.  "We do have children in the building and 32 units, so there are quite a few people in the building. I wanted to make sure I didn't just disregard it, so I did take it serious."

Fire crews aired out the building and checked all apartments for the gas. No one was hurt.

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