Madison
58° F
Mostly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Advertisement

How are vaccines produced?

Published On: Jul 11 2013 03:57:43 PM CDT   Updated On: Aug 23 2013 10:55:09 AM CDT
Vaccine shot

JurgaR/iStock

Before we can receive a vaccine it takes many years of research and testing to develop it.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention it can take between 10 and 15 years of research and testing before a vaccine is available to the public.

The CDC said the first stage in creating a vaccine is for scientists to develop an antigen that can prevent a disease. Once the initial vaccine is created it has to be cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for more investigation. According to the CDC, at least three more intense clinical trials over the course of several years are conducted to ensure the vaccine is effective and to determine dosage. Researchers also watch for any side effects.

In the final phase of testing the vaccine is given to a large test group of tens of thousands of human volunteers, according to the CDC.

If the vaccine passes all of the test phases it will await FDA approval. Once this approval is obtained the FDA will ensure the vaccine is safe by testing it and monitoring its production facilities, according to the CDC and the FDA. The FDA says it also monitors the vaccine long-term to document any reactions to the vaccine.

Advertisement
  • Mark Palma

    PHOTOS: House explosion in Fitchburg

    Officials said a 57-year-old man was injured in a house explosion on Cheryl Drive in Fitchburg Thursday night.

  • PHOTOS: DOT shows off new way to build, repair bridges

    Wisconsin Department of Transportation officials showed off a better way to build and repair small bridges Thursday.

    The process involves building retaining walls on each side of the waterway. After filling in the area with gravel, precast tops are put in place. A normal bridge project would take 2 or 3 months, but the new process can cut that time down dramatically.

  • PHOTOS: K-9 teams from across Wis. train on UW campus

    MADISON, Wis. -- University of Wisconsin-Madison police hosted a statewide explosives training day for K-9 teams Thursday on campus.

    UWPD spokesman Marc Lovicott said Thursday's training involved multiple scenarios including large load explosive detection, dark room scenarios, plus more typical game-day situations that officers and their K-9 partner routinely encounter such as distractions, loud noises and an encounter with Bucky Badger.

Advertisement