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Growth of tissues making progress through genetic techniques

Published On: Jul 30 2013 04:11:57 PM CDT   Updated On: Aug 15 2013 02:25:10 PM CDT
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According to “Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery,” the medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), progress has been made so that one day plastic surgeons may be able to use a patient’s own tissues during reconstructive surgery.

According to the ASPS, over the past decade researchers have developed several gene therapy techniques to grow skin, bone and other tissues to be used in reconstructive surgery.

Using gene therapy can help surgeons solve the problem of not having enough tissue to help correct a designated area the patient wants altered, according to the ASPS. For example, according to the ASPS, patients with large burns on their bodies often need more healthy tissue to treat the areas.

The ASPS says while progress has been made in gene therapy, there is still a gap to cover to make the move from the research lab to the operating room.

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