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UW campus works to get graduates out in 4 years

Published On: Aug 14 2013 09:41:14 AM CDT   Updated On: Aug 14 2013 09:41:41 AM CDT

MENOMONIE, Wis. -

Officials at the University of Wisconsin-Stout in Menomonie are working to boost the number of students graduating within four years, in part by limiting the number of credits required for degrees.

The Eau Claire Leader-Telegram reported university administrators are limiting the credits required for most degrees to 120, instead of the previous 124 to 130 credits. Four engineering programs require more credits because of accreditation requirements.

The university also has revised its lineup of general education classes for freshmen.

UW-Stout Chancellor Charles Sorensen said the changes are a response to student concerns about the increasing cost of higher education.

About 21 percent of the students who enrolled as freshmen at UW-Stout in 2007 graduated in four years.

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