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11 pct of Wis. kindergarteners not ready to read

Published On: May 06 2013 09:27:22 AM CDT


Eleven percent of Wisconsin kindergarten students aren't ready for classroom reading lessons.

That's according to newly released statewide test results. The Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening, or PALS test, was given to students for the first time last fall.

The Wisconsin State Journal obtained the results under the state's Open Records Law and reported them Monday.

Department of Public Instruction spokesman Patrick Gasper says the results weren't published because the test is meant to help classroom teachers and not to compare students.

Statewide, the test determined that 89 percent of kindergarten students have the early literacy skills needed to learn to read. Those skills include recognizing letters and letter sounds.

Kindergarteners are now taking a spring version of the test.

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