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DPI website provides info on Common Core myths

Published On: Oct 22 2013 04:57:23 PM CDT

Tony Evers

MADISON, Wis. -

The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction announced Tuesday that there are updated materials on its website to help parents, educators, policymakers and the public understand the facts behind the adoption and implementation of the Common Core State Standards.

The website provides background and answers on more than a dozen myths about the CCSS and clarifies facts, including how the standards are a giant leap in rigor for Wisconsin, according to a release.

Myths like no teachers were involved in writing the CCSS and common core reduces the reading of fiction and literature are not correct, officials said. More than a dozen teachers were on the writing team for the CCSS, coordinated by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers.

According to the release, a standards leadership team made up entirely of Wisconsin educators and content experts in math and English-language arts, provided feedback to multiple drafts of the CCSS before they were released.

Other myths, like implementation of the CCSS will lead to government collection and sharing of private personal and family information via an electronic database falsely skews the facts, according to the release. The CCSS does not include any new requirements for collecting or reporting data on school children.

“I understand that people are concerned with the pace of change in education,” State Superintendent Tony Evers said in the release. “But, we must transform education with a sense of urgency. Our kids already compete globally. We cannot go back to our outdated, weak standards, and we cannot pull the rug out from thousands of educators, students and parents who have put years of time and effort into reaching this higher bar.”

Evers said the CCSS are a step forward for the state and are the foundation for many other transformative efforts to improve student achievement.

“I invite every citizen to read these standards and learn why they have generated such broad support in Wisconsin and around the country,” Evers said.

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