Madison
67° F
Overcast
Overcast
Advertisement

Camille Tincher

Published On: Nov 24 2013 09:55:16 PM CST
STOUGHTON -

Camille Tincher, age 55, passed away on Saturday, November 23, 2013, at Agrace HospiceCare surrounded by her family, following a brief battle with cancer.

She was born in Peoria, IL, the daughter of George "Van" and Eileen Tincher. Camille enjoyed gardening and tending to her flowers and baking, especially for her family and friends. She had a big heart and loved to share.

Camille is survived by her son, Cody; her parents; siblings, Melanie (Dan) Williams, Mark (Brenda) and Lynelle (Dave) Byrne; seven nephews, Nick (Aly), Wynne, Wesley (Megan), Joel, Riley, Wade and Brett; niece, Beth; and great niece, Stella.

A Celebration of Camille's life will be held at 4:00 PM on Tuesday, November 26, 2013 at Cress Funeral Home in Stoughton. Friends may greet the family from 3:00 PM until the time of services Tuesday.

Memorials may be made to Agrace HospiceCare Inc. The family would like to thank the staffs of St. Mary's Hospital and Agrace HospiceCare and friends and family members for all of their prayers.

Advertisement
  • Lethal injection

    Reuters

    History of the death penalty in America

    The alleged botched execution of Arizona prison inmate Joseph Wood has put capital punishment -- specifically, the manner in which criminals are executed -- back in the spotlight. Take a look at the history of the death penalty in America.

  • Pope Francis, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio

    REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

    Reasons why Pope Francis is cool

    Pope Francis is coming to the U.S. in Sept., to head the eighth World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia, according to the National Catholic Reporter. Take a look at the many reasons why Pope Francis is cool.

  • smile

    istock

    Happiest/unhappiest U.S. cities

    It seems that residents of Louisiana are some of the happiest people in the country, and New Yorkers remain some of the unhappiest, according to a new report. Take a look at the happiest - and unhappiest - U.S. cities.

Advertisement