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Women want to see breast reconstruction results

Published On: Dec 20 2012 12:41:56 PM CST
Updated On: Jan 04 2013 02:25:32 PM CST

Don’t perform routine cancer screening for dialysis patients with limited life expectancies without signs or symptoms.

A survey conducted by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) shows that 89 percent of women want to see breast reconstruction surgery results before they undergo breast cancer treatment.

Breast cancer organizations reported that women wanted more information on breast reconstruction than just looking at a piece of paper. Women wanted to be able to look at actual surgery results and be able to have more discussions about what to expect.

Because of the data, the ASPS launched a show-and-tell event to make women more comfortable with reconstruction before they begin their cancer treatments.

The survey also showed that 23 percent of women were aware of all of their breast reconstruction options and about 19 percent were aware that the timing of their procedures and treatments has an effect on their options and results.

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