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Man apprehended after car chase in Dodge County

Published On: Apr 19 2013 01:42:53 PM CDT

MADISON, Wis. -

Dodge County sheriff’s deputies apprehended a suspect on charges involving drug possession after a vehicle chase ending in Beaver Dam.

A deputy stopped a vehicle early Friday morning for a traffic violation. During the stop, the deputy observed a possible controlled substance.

During questioning, the suspect fled in his vehicle, reaching speeds in excess of 120 mph, according to a news release from the sheriff’s department.

According to deputies, the length of the pursuit was 5.2 miles, starting on US 151 in the Town of Calamus and ending in Beaver Dam. The suspect fled his vehicle in Beaver Dam and was found later at his home. Deputies obtained consent to search at the home and found the suspect in his basement.

The suspect was taken into custody on charges of eluding an officer, possession of a controlled substance, operating while suspended and obstructing an officer. The suspect, a 49-year-old man said he fled because he didn’t want to go back to prison.

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