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Janesville school administrators offered incentive pay

Published On: Jan 09 2013 08:26:21 AM CST
Updated On: Jan 09 2013 08:27:26 AM CST

JANESVILLE, Wis. -

Principals and other administrators in the Janesville School District will now have the chance to earn raises for their performance.

The Janesville School Board approved the incentive-pay system at its meeting Tuesday.

The new system would rate administrators on skills, ability, and performance, rather than award pay increases based on experience. District spokesman Keith Pennington said if all 35 administrators received the full 6 percent, it would cost about $200,000 per year.

The directors, principals, assistant principals, coordinators, and supervisors who would be covered by the program have an average annual salary of $98,000.

Superintendent Karen Schulte told the Janesville Gazette the performance standards are so high that it’s unlikely anyone will earn the full 6 percent.

Human Resources Director Steve Sperry said administrators' pay was frozen in 2009, 2011, and 2012. He said they received a 2.25 percent raise in 2010.

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