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Finding pain relief in unexpected places

Published On: Feb 25 2013 10:45:52 AM CST   Updated On: Mar 11 2013 02:15:19 PM CDT
Knee pain

iStock / KenTannenbaum

(NewsUSA) - Sometimes, the most effective products are made for horses. Wait, what?

Well, it's true. Developers and users of horse care products -- from grooming supplies to balms and ointments -- have been so thrilled with the results on horses that they wasted no time trying them on people. Fast-forward 40 years, and celebrities like Jennifer Aniston, Demi Moore and Kim Kardashian use horse shampoo regularly to nourish their expensive locks.

It's not just hair products either. According to some experts in the pet care industry, borrowing products meant for animals is a fast-growing trend. Recently, the storeowner of Sandhills Feed Supply in Southern Pines, N.C., Janet Fowler, has noticed an equine pain reliever that helps with human aches.

"Many customers walk in and ask for Absorbine Veterinary Gel -- and we know most of them use it on themselves as well as their animals!" says Fowler, "We use it ourselves and tell our customers we couldn't get along without it. And it's from a company that is over 120 years old so you can depend on them. Once a customer tries it, they usually come back and get another for a relative or friend -- it's a good product with a good reputation."

Absorbine Gel is a spearmint-scented gel with a trio of botanical extracts: calendula, echinacea and wormwood. The natural agents, combined with menthol to loosen stiff joints and reduce swelling, offer fast relief from joint pain, muscle aches and strains.

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